Concerts

Auditioning Tenors & Basses

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Founded in 1993, Dulces Voces (Sweet Voices) is a vocal ensemble specializing in secular and sacred music composed before 1750. The ensemble, based in Lincoln, Nebraska, performs mostly a cappella music with no conductor or advisor, and therefore draws on its volunteer members for repertoire and performance practice. The members come from varying backgrounds and professions, and all profoundly love making music together.

We are excited to grow our membership this season and will be holding auditions for Tenors and Basses this fall beginning in August.  Auditions will be held by appointment during our regular rehearsal time (Mondays 6 – 8 pm).  Other voice parts will be considered if interest is expressed.

All interested singers should apply by filling out the form below.  Questions may be directed to dulcesvoces@gmail.com.  If you are having trouble viewing the form, click here.

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June 27 & 28: Flatwater Shakespeare Company

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As You Like It in The Swan at Wyuka in Lincoln

As You Like ItWe are so pleased to sing a few songs before the Flatwater Shakespeare Company’s production of As You Like It! The curtain goes up at 7 PM, and we will be there a bit before (June 27 & 28) to warm up the audience. We wish to thank Lincoln Friends of Chamber Music for partnering with us on these performances.

Flatwater performs As You Like It each weekend of June. If you attended our concert last month, you know you can expect a wonderful performance!

For ticket and venue information, visit Flatwater Shakespeare Company’s website.

A Month of Maying: May 30, 2015, 8 PM

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A Month of Maying 5-30-15 8 PM
Saturday, May 30th, 8 PM, St. Mark’s on the Campus Episcopal Church, 13th & R Streets, Lincoln, Nebraska

We are excited to have special guests from the Flatwater Shakespeare Company join us for a scene from As You Like It. This concert is all about what the merry, merry month of May has to offer.


This sweet and merry month of May, William Byrd (ca. 1540 – 1623)

Bonjour mon coeur, Claude Goudimel (ca. 1514 – 1572)
Hello my heart, hello my sweet life, hello my eye, hello my dear friend!
Ah hello, my most beautiful one, my sweetheart; hello, my delight, my love, my sweet spring, my fresh new flower, my sweet pleasure, my sweet little dove, my sparrow, my turtledove! Hello, my sweet rebel.

Ecce, amica mea, Cristóbal de Morales (ca. 1500 – 1553)
Behold, O my love, my dove, my beautiful, my beautiful one
She cometh leaping upon the mountains, skipping over the hills.
My beloved is like a roe, or a young hart. Behold my beloved, my beautiful one,
standeth behind our wall, looking through the windows, looking through the lattices.
Behold my beloved speaketh to me.
Arise, make haste, my dove, my fair one, and come away; my love, my dove, my beautiful one, and come.
For winter is now past, the rain is over and gone. Come, my dove.
The flowers have appeared in our land, the time of pruning is come: the voice of the turtledove is heard in our land:
The fig tree hath put forth her green figs: the vines in flower yield their sweet smell. Arise, my love, my beautiful one, and come:
My dove in the clefts of the rock, in the hollow places of the wall, shew me thy face, let thy voice sound in my ears: for thy voice is sweet, and thy face comely.

Clear or cloudy, John Dowland (ca. 1563 – 1626)

Act III, Scene 2 from As You Like It, William Shakespeare (1564 – 1616)
Emma Gruhl, Megan Higgins, and Cale Yates of Flatwater Shakespeare Company

Ay! linda amiga, Anonymous (16th c.)
Oh, beautiful beloved whom I will never see again,
Exquisite body that brings me death.
There is no love without pain,
Nor pain without grief,
Nor pain so sharp as that of love.
Get me up, mother, when the sun rises.
I went throughout the green fields
Looking for my love.

Por Mayo era, Anonymous (16th c.)
‘Twas in May, sometime in May, when it gets hot, when ladies and maidens all go about with lovers, when those who are suffering go to serve their loves. But I don’t know when it’s daytime nor do I know when it’s nighttime, if not for a little bird that sings to me at dawn.

Surge, propera amica mea, Orlande de Lassus (1532-1594)
Arise, my love, my dove, my fair one, and come away;
For winter is now past, the rain is over and gone. Come, my dove.
The flowers have appeared in our land, the time of pruning is come: the voice of the turtledove is heard in our land:
The fig tree hath put forth her green figs: the vines in flower yield their sweet smell. Arise, my love,
my beautiful one, and come:
My dove in the clefts of the rock, in the hollow places of the wall, shew me thy face, let thy voice sound in my ears: for thy voice is sweet, and thy face comely.

La rosa enflorece, Traditional Sephardic, arr. Angelina Figus
The rose flowers in May.
My soul dims, suffering from love.
Nightingales sing and sigh of love
And passion kills me, increasing my pain.
Come more quickly, my dove,
More quickly to me,
More quickly you my soul: I feel myself dying.

Now is the month of maying, Thomas Morley (ca. 1557 – 1602)


We are very pleased to partner with the Flatwater Shakespeare Company and Sheldon Friends of Chamber Music.